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Correction of gradient-induced phase errors in radial MRI

Authors

  • Amir Moussavi,

    Corresponding author
    1. Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am MPI für biophysikalische Chemie, Göttingen, Germany
    2. DFG Research Center for Molecular Physiology of the Brain (CMPB), Göttingen, Germany
    • Correspondence to: Amir Moussavi, M.Sc., Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am Max-Planck-Institut für biophysikalische Chemie, 37070 Göttingen, Germany. E-mail: smoussa@gwdg.de

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  • Markus Untenberger,

    1. Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am MPI für biophysikalische Chemie, Göttingen, Germany
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  • Martin Uecker,

    1. Depatment of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
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  • Jens Frahm

    1. Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am MPI für biophysikalische Chemie, Göttingen, Germany
    2. DFG Research Center for Molecular Physiology of the Brain (CMPB), Göttingen, Germany
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Abstract

Purpose

To correct gradient-induced phase errors in radial MRI.

Methods

Gradient-induced eddy currents affect the MRI data acquisition by gradient delays and phase errors that may lead to severe image artifacts for non-Cartesian imaging scenarios such as radial trajectories. While gradient delays are dealt with by respective shifts of the acquisition window during radial image acquisition, this work introduces a simple method for quantifying and correcting phase errors from the actual data prior to image reconstruction. For a given gradient system, the approach yields a specific phase error per gradient that can be used for correcting the raw data.

Results

Phantom studies at 9.4 T demonstrated marked improvements in radial image quality. It could be shown that the phase correction is not compromised by data undersampling. Moreover, the selective correction of gradient-induced phase errors retained the phase information caused by different concentrations of a paramagnetic contrast agent.

Conclusion

The proposed method does not require additional reference measurements and separately corrects for phase errors induced by eddy currents, while retaining the residual phase of the object which may carry physiologic information. Magn Reson Med 71:308–312, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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