Mycophenolate mofetil in the therapy of polymyositis associated with a polyautoimmune syndrome

Authors

  • C. Schneider MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology and Clinical Research Group for Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology, University of Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080 Würzburg, Germany
    • Department of Neurology and Clinical Research Group for Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology, University of Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080 Würzburg, Germany
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  • R. Gold MD,

    1. Department of Neurology and Clinical Research Group for Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology, University of Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080 Würzburg, Germany
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  • M. Schäfers MD,

    1. Department of Neurology and Clinical Research Group for Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology, University of Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080 Würzburg, Germany
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  • K.V. Toyka MD

    1. Department of Neurology and Clinical Research Group for Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology, University of Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080 Würzburg, Germany
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Abstract

Mycophenolate mofetil 1.5 g daily (30 mg/kg body weight) was given to a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, ulcerative colitis, and severe refractory polymyositis after conventional treatment regimes had failed. No severe side effects occurred. Considerable improvement of clinical symptoms and electromyographic findings were seen within 6 months after the initiation of mycophenolate mofetil, allowing for tapering and discontinuation of methylprednisolone. Mycophenolate mofetil may be considered as an useful alternative in the treatment of polymyositis when standard therapeutic regimens fail. © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Muscle Nerve 25: 286–288, 2002 DOI 10.1002/mus.10026

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