Matrix metalloproteinases and skeletal muscle: A brief review

Authors

  • Eli Carmeli PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Stanley Steyer School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978, Israel
    • Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Stanley Steyer School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978, Israel
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  • Miri Moas MSc,

    1. Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Stanley Steyer School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978, Israel
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  • Abraham Z. Reznick PhD,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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  • Raymond Coleman PhD

    1. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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Abstract

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc- dependent proteolytic enzymes that function mainly in the extracellular matrix, where they contribute to the development, functioning, and pathology of a wide range of tissues. This mini-review describes the MMPs and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs) in skeletal muscle, and considers their involvement in muscle development, ischemia, myonecrosis, angiogenesis, denervation, exercise-induced injuries, disuse atrophy, muscle repair and regeneration, and inflammatory myopathies and dystrophies. Despite the very limited information currently available on MMPs and their inhibitors in skeletal muscle, it is becoming increasingly clear that they have important physiological functions in maintenance of the integrity and homeostasis of muscle fibers and of the extracellular matrix. Understanding the roles of MMPs and TIMPs may lead to the development of new drug-related treatments for various muscle disorders based on suppression or upregulation of their expression. Muscle Nerve 29: 191–197, 2004

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