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Signaling satellite-cell activation in skeletal muscle: Markers, models, stretch, and potential alternate pathways

Authors

  • Ashley C. Wozniak BSc,

    1. Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, 730 William Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0W2, Canada
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  • Jiming Kong PhD,

    1. Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, 730 William Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0W2, Canada
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  • Erika Bock,

    1. Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, 730 William Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0W2, Canada
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  • Orest Pilipowicz DMD,

    1. Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, 730 William Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0W2, Canada
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  • Judy E. Anderson PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, 730 William Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0W2, Canada
    • Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, 730 William Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0W2, Canada
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Abstract

Activation of skeletal muscle satellite cells, defined as entry to the cell cycle from a quiescent state, is essential for normal growth and for regeneration of tissue damaged by injury or disease. This review focuses on early events of activation by signaling through nitric oxide and hepatocyte growth factor, and by mechanical stimuli. The impact of various model systems used to study activation and the regulation of satellite-cell quiescence are placed in the context of activation events in other tissues, concluding with a speculative model of alternate pathways signaling satellite-cell activation. Muscle Nerve, 2005

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