Muscle velocity recovery cycles: Effects of repetitive stimulation on two muscles

Authors

  • Delphine BoËRio PhD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
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  • Werner J. Z'graggen MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
    2. Department of Neurosurgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
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  • S. Veronica Tan MD,

    1. MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    2. Department of Neurology and Neurophysiology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Lambeth Palace Road, London SE7 1EH, UK
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  • Andri Guetg BSc,

    1. Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
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  • Karin Ackermann MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
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  • Hugh Bostock PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
    2. MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    3. Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, Institute of Neurology, University College London, Queen Square WC1N 3BG, London, UK
    • Department of Neurology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
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Abstract

Introduction:

We sought to characterize the excitability properties of tibialis anterior (TA) and brachioradialis (BR) muscles at rest and during electrically induced muscle activation in normal subjects.

Methods:

Two centers recruited 10 subjects each. Multi-fiber velocity recovery cycles (VRCs) were recorded from TA (both centers) and BR (one center). VRCs were assessed at rest and during repetitive stimulation (intermittent 20 Hz for 6 min). Changes in latency and peak amplitude of the muscle action potential induced by a frequency ramp to 30 Hz were also characterized.

Results:

Excitability properties recorded from TA were very similar between centers. Repetitive stimulation generated marked excitability changes, which were similar between TA and BR.

Conclusions:

Standardized tests of muscle VRCs and responses to repetitive stimulation can provide consistent measures of membrane function and may encourage their wider use in clinical neurophysiology to investigate the pathophysiology of neuromuscular disorders. Muscle Nerve 46: 102–111, 2012

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