Utilizing a handheld electrode array for localized muscle impedance measurements

Authors

  • Pushpa Narayanaswami MD,

    1. Departments of Neurology and Orthopedics, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 USA
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  • Andrew J. Spieker BS,

    1. Departments of Neurology and Orthopedics, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 USA
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  • Phillip Mongiovi BA,

    1. Departments of Neurology and Orthopedics, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 USA
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  • John C. Keel MD,

    1. Departments of Neurology and Orthopedics, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 USA
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  • Stefan C. Muzin MD,

    1. Departments of Neurology and Orthopedics, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 USA
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  • Seward B. Rutkove MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Neurology and Orthopedics, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 USA
    • Departments of Neurology and Orthopedics, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 USA
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Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a noninvasive technique used for assessment of muscle health in which a high-frequency, low-amplitude electric current is applied to the skin overlying a muscle, and the resulting surface voltage is measured. We have previously used adhesive electrodes, application of which is inconvenient. We present data using a handheld electrode array (HEA) that we devised to expedite the EIM procedure in a clinical setting.

Methods:

Thirty-four healthy volunteers and 24 radiculopathy subjects underwent EIM testing using the HEA and adhesive electrodes.

Results:

The HEA was shown to have good test–retest reproducibility, with intraclass correlation coefficients as high as 0.99. HEA data correlated strongly with data from adhesive electrodes, ρ = 0.85 in healthy volunteers (P < 0.001) and ρ = 0.75 in radiculopathy subjects (P < 0.001).

Conclusions:

These data support the potential use of a handheld array for performing rapid localized surface impedance measurements. Muscle Nerve 46: 257–263, 2012

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