The effect of temperature on amount and structure of motor variability during 2-minute maximum voluntary contraction

Authors

  • Marius Brazaitis PhD,

    1. Movement Fundamentals and Clinical Research Centre, Department of Applied Biology and Physiotherapy, Lithuanian Academy of Physical Education, Sporto 6, LT-44221 Kaunas, Lithuania
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  • Albertas Skurvydas PhD,

    1. Movement Fundamentals and Clinical Research Centre, Department of Applied Biology and Physiotherapy, Lithuanian Academy of Physical Education, Sporto 6, LT-44221 Kaunas, Lithuania
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  • Kazimieras Pukėnas PhD,

    1. Movement Fundamentals and Clinical Research Centre, Department of Applied Biology and Physiotherapy, Lithuanian Academy of Physical Education, Sporto 6, LT-44221 Kaunas, Lithuania
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  • Laura Daniusevic̆iūtė MD,

    1. Physical Education and Health Centre, Department of Physical Education, Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania
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  • Dalia Mickevic̆ienė PhD,

    1. Movement Fundamentals and Clinical Research Centre, Department of Applied Biology and Physiotherapy, Lithuanian Academy of Physical Education, Sporto 6, LT-44221 Kaunas, Lithuania
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  • Rima Solianik MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Movement Fundamentals and Clinical Research Centre, Department of Applied Biology and Physiotherapy, Lithuanian Academy of Physical Education, Sporto 6, LT-44221 Kaunas, Lithuania
    • Movement Fundamentals and Clinical Research Centre, Department of Applied Biology and Physiotherapy, Lithuanian Academy of Physical Education, Sporto 6, LT-44221 Kaunas, Lithuania
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Abstract

Introduction:

In this study, we questioned whether local cooling of muscle or heating involving core and muscle temperatures are the main indicators for force variability.

Methods:

Ten volunteers performed a 2-min maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the knee extensors under control (CON) conditions after passive heating (HT) and cooling (CL) of the lower body.

Results:

HT increased muscle and rectal temperatures, whereas CL lowered muscle temperature but did not affect rectal temperature. During 2-min MVC, peak force decreased to a lower level in HT compared with CON and CL experiments. Greater central fatigue was found in the HT experiment, and there was less in the CL experiment than in the CON experiment.

Conclusions:

Increased core and muscle temperature increased physiological tremor and the amount and structural complexity of force variability of the exercising muscles, whereas local muscle cooling decreased all force variability variables measured. Muscle Nerve, 2012

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