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Sensory relearning after surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome: A pilot clinical trial

Authors

  • Christina Jerosch-Herold MSc, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Allied Health Professions, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
    • Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Allied Health Professions, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
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  • Lee Shepstone MSc, PhD,

    1. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK
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  • Leanne Miller BSc(Hons)

    1. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Allied Health Professions, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
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  • Disclosure: This report is based on independent research from a Career Development Research Training Fellowship supported by the National Institute for Health Research. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the National Institute for Health Research, or the Department of Health.

Abstract

Introduction: Surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome does not always alleviate sensory deficits, especially in patients with severe disease. No proven treatment is currently available for these patients. Methods: We conducted a pilot randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the feasibility, patient acceptability, and efficacy of a sensory relearning (SR) program in patients who have ongoing sensory deficits after carpal tunnel decompression. Patients were randomized to receive either: (i) a 4-week sensory relearning home program; or (ii) no further treatment. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and 4 and 8 weeks after randomization. Results: Thirty-one patients were randomized. Efficacy analysis adjusted for baseline score and age showed a potentially clinically worthwhile benefit of SR. Conclusions: Data on screening, eligibility, and patient acceptability of the intervention confirm the feasibility of undertaking a definitive randomized, controlled trial. Muscle Nerve, 2012

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