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Muscle force development after low-frequency magnetic burst stimulation in dogs

Authors

  • Daniela Emrich DrMedVet,

    Corresponding author
    1. Section of Clinical and Comparative Neuropathology, Institute of Veterinary Pathology, Centre for Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany
    • Section of Clinical and Comparative Neuropathology, Institute of Veterinary Pathology, Centre for Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig Maximilian University, Veterinärstrasse 13, 80539 Munich, Germany
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  • Andrea Fischer Prof DECVN,

    1. Section of Neurology, Clinic of Small Animal Medicine, Centre for Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany
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  • Caroline Altenhöfer DVM,

    1. Section of Neurology, Clinic of Small Animal Medicine, Centre for Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany
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  • Thomas Weyh Prof DrRerNat,

    1. Neuroelectronics and Biosensors Division, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany
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  • Florian Helling MSc,

    1. Neuroelectronics and Biosensors Division, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany
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  • Stefan Goetz MSc,

    1. Neuroelectronics and Biosensors Division, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany
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  • Markus Brielmeier DrMedVet,

    1. Department of Comparative Medicine, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany
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  • Kaspar Matiasek Prof DrMedVet

    1. Section of Clinical and Comparative Neuropathology, Institute of Veterinary Pathology, Centre for Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany
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Abstract

Introduction:

Magnetic stimulation allows for painless and non-invasive extrinsic motor nerve stimulation. Despite several advantages, the limited coupling to the target reduces the application of magnetic pulses in rehabilitation. According to experience with electrical stimulation, magnetic bursts could remove this constraint.

Methods:

A novel burst stimulator was used to apply single and burst pulses to the femoral nerve in 10 adult dogs. A figure-of-eight coil was connected, and pulses were applied at 7.5 HZ. Contractions of the quadriceps muscle were measured via an angle force transducer.

Results:

Muscle forces were significantly higher upon burst stimulation than after single pulses. Four consecutive burst pulses proved most effective. Stimulation by more bursts resulted in fatigue.

Conclusion:

Burst stimulation is superior to standard magnetic single pulses, and 4 consecutive burst pulses proved most effective. Muscle Nerve, 2012

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