Immunohistochemical differential distribution of S-100α and S-100β in the peripheral nervous system of the rat

Authors

  • Dr. Kimiya Sugimura MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan
    • Department of Neurology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 Japan
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  • Dr. Hajime Haimoto MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan
    Current affiliation:
    1. Laboratory of Pathology, Aichi Cancer Center, Kanokoden, Tashiro-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464, Japan
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  • Dr. Hiroshi Nagura MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan
    Current affiliation:
    1. Research Institute for Disease Mechanism and Control, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466, Japan
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  • Dr. Kanefusa Kato MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Biochemistry, Institute for Developmental Research, Aichi Prefectural Colony, Kamiya, Kasugai, Aichi 480–03, Japan
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  • Akira Takahashi MD

    1. Department of Neurology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan
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Abstract

The localization of the α subunit of the S-100 protein (S-100α) and β subunit (S-100β) was studied in the peripheral nervous system of the rat. In peripheral nerves, S-100α and S-100β were found in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells. Axons were positively stained in part by S-100α and almost totally by S-100β. In the dorsal root ganglia, S-100β was found in satellite cells and their processes and in some neurons. S-100β was found in more of the large neurons, but almost all of the small neurons were negative for S-100β. In the anterior horn cells, S-100β staining was stronger than that of S-100β. In Schwann cells, both S-100β and S-100β were present on the rough endoplasmic reticulum, free ribosomes, and nucleus, as seen by electron microscopy. The S-100α and S-100β in axons were associated with microtubules and neurofilaments.

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