Blood flow of the urinary bladder: Effects of outlet obstruction and correlation with bioenergetic metabolism

Authors

  • Alex Tong-Long Lin,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Veterans General Hospital-Taipei and College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
    • Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Veterans General Hospital-Taipei, No. 201, Section 2, Shih-Pai Road, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Ming-Tsun Chen,

    1. Yin Shu-Tien Urological Institute, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
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  • Chin-Hua Yang,

    1. Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Veterans General Hospital-Taipei and College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
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  • Luke S. Chang

    1. Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Veterans General Hospital-Taipei and College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
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Abstract

This study investigated the effects of outlet obstruction on blood flow and high energy phosphates content in the rabbit urinary bladder. Mild bladder outlet obstruction was induced by placing a silicon ring (diameter 7 mm) around the bladder neck of each male New Zealand White rabbit (n = 7). Before and immediately after inducing obstruction, and 2 weeks later, the bladders were emptied and regional blood flow measured using laser Doppler flowmetry (LASERFLO BPM2, Vasamedics Inc., St. Paul, Minnesota). Six different areas of each bladder were measured, and the average blood flow calculated for each rabbit. Then, the animals were sacrificed, the bladder excised, and the tissue content of high energy phosphates determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Six normal male New Zealand White rabbits served as controls. The results can be summarized as follows: (1) Before surgery, bladder blood flow was similar in all animals (16.3 ml/min/100 g); positioning the silicon ring around the bladder neck did not affect blood perfusion. two weeks after the induction of outlet obstruction, bladder blood flow was significantly decreased (4.9 ml/min/100 g). (2) There was no significant difference between control and obstructed bladders in NAD, AMP, or ADP content. However, the obstructed bladders contained significantly less phosphocreatine (12.0 vs 21.9 nmol/mg protein) and ATP (4.0 vs. 6.1 nmol/mg protein) than control bladders.

In summary, this study showed that urinary bladder blood flow was reduced by outlet obstruction, and the reduction in blood flow was associated with decreased tissue high energy phosphates content. Decreased blood flow might be an important factor in the disarranged energy metabolism and functional impairment exhibited by the urinary bladder following Outlet Obstruction. © 1995 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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