Get access

Enhanced interpretability of the PFDI-20 with establishment of reference scores among women in the general population

Authors

  • Adam Gafni-Kane,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, NorthShore University HealthSystem and the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Evanston, Illinois
    • Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, 1000 Central Street #730, Evanston, IL 60201.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Roger P. Goldberg,

    1. Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, NorthShore University HealthSystem and the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Evanston, Illinois
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Peter K. Sand,

    1. Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, NorthShore University HealthSystem and the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Evanston, Illinois
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sylvia M. Botros

    1. Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, NorthShore University HealthSystem and the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Evanston, Illinois
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Mickey Karram led the peer-review process as the Associate Editor responsible for the paper.

  • Conflict of interest: none.

Abstract

Aims

To enhance the interpretability of the PFDI-20 by establishing a score distribution for women in the general population and to determine whether scores correspond with urinary and anal incontinence (UI and AI).

Methods

Subjects recruited during Twins Day Festivals from 2004 to 2009 completed a survey assessing for stress and urgency urinary incontinence (SUI and UUI) and AI of flatus and stool. Score distributions for the PFDI-20 and each of its subscales were determined for all subjects and for women with isolated forms of incontinence. Scores were compared between continent and incontinent women and between incontinent subtypes by Wilcoxon rank-sum tests.

Results

One thousand three hundred seventy-six women completed the survey with PFDI-20 (Median = 8.9, IQR 31.3), POPDI-6 (Median = 0, IQR = 8.3), CRADI-8 (Median = 0, IQR = 10.7), and UDI-6 (Median = 0, IQR = 16.7). PFDI-20, POPDI-6, CRADI-8, and UDI-6 scores were significantly greater among women reporting isolated SUI (P < 0.0001, P = 0.04, P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, respectively), UUI (P < 0.0001, P = 0.02, P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, respectively), mixed UI (P < 0.0001 each), AI flatus (P < 0.0001 each), and AI stool (P < 0.0001 each) compared to those denying incontinence. Women with mixed UI had significantly greater PFDI-20 and UDI-6 scores compare to those with SUI (P < 0.0001) or UUI (P < 0.0001). Subjects with AI stool had significantly greater PFDI-20 and CRADI-8 scores compared to those with AI flatus (P = 0.01).

Conclusions

PFDI-20 scores from a sample of the general population correspond with the presence or absence of UI and AI. These normative and symptom-specific score distributions for the PFDI-20 provide reference points to gauge the effect of disease and intervention on quality of life for women with incontinence. Neurourol. Urodynam. 31:1252–1257, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Ancillary