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Reflux esophagitis increased the risk of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis: A 3-year follow-up study§

Authors

  • Jiunn-Horng Kang,

    1. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
    2. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Joseph J. Keller,

    1. School of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Yi-Kuang Chen,

    1. Department of Urology, Taipei County Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Herng-Ching Lin

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Health Care Administration, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
    • School of Health Care Administration, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing St., Taipei 110, Taiwan.
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  • Roger Dmochowski led the peer-review process as the Associate Editor responsible for the paper.

  • Conflict of interest: none.

  • §

    Jiunn-Horng Kang and Joseph Keller contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

Aims

Reflux esophagitis (RE) is a common disease which has been recognized to be associated with several medical co-morbidities. However, the association between RE and bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is still unknown. The present study aimed to explore the association between these two diseases.

Methods

We identified 8,962 female patients who had received a diagnosis of RE as the study cohort. We randomly selected 44,810 subjects to be included as the comparison cohort. Each patient in this study was individually tracked for a 3-year period to identify those who subsequently received a diagnosis of BPS/IC. Cox proportional hazards regressions were carried out to estimate the 3-year risk of BPS/IC following a diagnosis of RE.

Results

The incidence of BPS/IC following a diagnosis of RE was 4.3% during the follow-up period for all subjects. The incidence rate of BPS/IC was 2.38 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.21–2.57] per 100 person-years in patients with RE, and 1.24 (95% CI: 1.18–1.30) per 100 person-years in controls. Cox proportional analysis indicated that the hazard ratio (HR) of BPS/IC for patients with RE was 2.00 (95% CI = 1.82–2.20, P < 0.001) that of controls. The adjusted HR of BPS/IC for patients with RE was 1.40 (95% CI = 1.27–1.55, P < 0.001) after taking age group, urbanization level, and medical comorbidity into consideration.

Conclusion

We found that patients with RE were at a higher risk than with comparison patients for having been subsequently diagnosed with BPS/IC during longitudinal follow-up. Neurourol. Urodynam. 32: 271–275, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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