Central nervous targets for the treatment of bladder dysfunction

Authors

  • Naoki Yoshimura,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    • Correspondence to: Naoki Yoshimura, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Suite 700 Kaufmann Medical Building 3471 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213; E-mail: nyos@pitt.edu

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  • Minoru Miyazato,

    1. Department of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Takeya Kitta,

    1. Department of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Satoru Yoshikawa

    1. Department of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Conflict of interest: None.
  • Karl-Erik Andersson led the peer-review process as the Associate Editor responsible for the article.

Abstract

Background

The functions of the lower urinary tract, to store and periodically release urine, are dependent on the activity of smooth and striated muscles in the urinary bladder, urethra, and external urethral sphincter. This activity is in turn controlled by neural circuits in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia.

Aims

This paper will review recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of voiding disorders, especially focusing on the central nervous system.

Methods

Various neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine, norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, excitatory and inhibitory amino acids, adenosine triphosphate, nitric oxide, and neuropeptides, have been implicated in the neural regulation of the lower urinary tract.

Results

Injuries or diseases of the nervous system, as well as drugs and disorders of the peripheral organs, can produce voiding dysfunctions such as urinary frequency, urgency, or incontinence.

Conclusion

We discuss the potential targets in the central nervous system and new modalities for the treatment of voiding dysfunction. Neurourol. Urodynam. 33:59–66, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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