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Pad stress tests with increasing load for the diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence

Authors


  • Mickey-Karram led the peer-review process as the Associate Editor responsible for the paper.
  • Conflict of interest: none.

Abstract

Aim

The aim of the study was to test the ability of pad stress tests with increasing load (supine, jumping on the floor, and jumping on a trampoline) to document stress incontinence in subjectively stress incontinent women.

Methods

In this prospective study 147 subjectively stress and mixed incontinent women performed consecutively the three pad stress tests with a bladder volume of 300 ml. Nineteen women performed a second trampoline pad stress test to test repeatability of the test. Nine continent women performed a trampoline pad stress test in order to determine if subjectively continent women would leak during the test.

Results

Seventy-two women (49%) leaked during the supine, 136 (93%) leaked during the jumping, and 146 (99%) leaked during the trampoline pad stress test. The differences between pad stress tests were significant with P < 0.005. Correlation between the two trampoline pad stress tests was high at 0.8. None of the nine continent women leaked during the trampoline pad stress test.

Conclusion

: The supine pad stress test has low sensitivity and is therefore often falsely negative. The jumping pad stress test is a simple test to perform and is satisfactory for everyday use. Subjectively stress incontinent women who do not leak during the jumping pad stress test may perform a trampoline pad stress test to document stress incontinence. The trampoline pad stress test is also simple to perform and detected leakage in 91% of the women who did not leak during the jumping pad stress test. Neurourol. Urodynam. 33:1135–1139, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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