Urodynamic results, clinical efficacy, and complication rates of sacral intradural deafferentation and sacral anterior root stimulation in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction resulting from complete spinal cord injury

Authors


  • Conflict of interest: none.
  • Christopher Chapple led the peer-review process as the Associate Editor responsible for the paper.
  • Correction added on 20 February 2014, after first online publication. The first author's name was corrected to “D. Krasmik”

Abstract

Aims

To investigate the outcome and complications of sacral deafferentation (SDAF) and sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) resulting from complete spinal cord injury (SCI).

Methods

Retrospective chart analysis of 137 patients who underwent SDAF/SARS at a single institution. Patients were categorized as being at risk of renal damage when the maximum detrusor pressure was >40 cmH2O or detrusor compliance was <20 ml/cmH2O.

Results

After a mean follow-up time of 14.8 ± 5.3 years, SDAF/SARS treatment significantly (P < 0.001) reduced the number of patients suffering from elevated detrusor pressure from 65 to 2, and from low detrusor compliance from 62 to 13, respectively. Mean bladder capacity significantly (P < 0.001) improved from 272.4 ± 143.0 to 475.0 ± 82.7 ml. The mean number of symptomatic UTI also decreased significantly (P < 0.001) from 6.2 ± 4.5 to 2.5 ± 2.6 per year. The number of patients suffering from incontinence had significantly (P < 0.001) decreased from 70 to 44. At the last follow-up visit, 107 (78.1%) patients were still using the stimulator. A total of 84 complications requiring surgical revision were observed. Defects of the stimulator cables or the receiver plate were the most common events (n = 38). The retrospective design pertains to the limitations of the study.

Conclusions

Sacral deafferentation and SARS are an effective treatment option for refractory NLUTD in patients with complete SCI, despite a substantial long-term complication rate. Neurourol. Urodynam. 33:1202–1206, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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