Get access

Doubly selective multiple quantum chemical shift imaging and T1 relaxation time measurement of glutathione (GSH) in the human brain in vivo

Authors

  • In-Young Choi,

    Corresponding author
    1. Hoglund Brain Imaging Center, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
    3. Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
    • The Nathan Kline Institute, Medical Physics, Orangeburg, NY, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Phil Lee

    1. Hoglund Brain Imaging Center, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
    2. Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
    3. The Nathan Kline Institute, Medical Physics, Orangeburg, NY, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

In-Young Choi, Ph.D., Hoglund Brain Imaging Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Mail Stop 1052, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA.

E-mail: ichoi@kumc.edu

Abstract

Mapping of a major antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), was achieved in the human brain in vivo using a doubly-selective multiple quantum filtering based chemical shift imaging (CSI) of GSH at 3 T. Both in vivo and phantom tests in CSI and single voxel measurements were consistent with excellent suppression of overlapping signals from creatine, γ-Amino butyric acid (GABA) and macromolecules. GSH concentration in the fronto-parietal region was 1.20 ± 0.16 µmol/g (mean ± SD, n = 7). The longitudinal relaxation time (T1) of GSH in the human brain was 397 ± 44 ms (mean ± SD, n = 5), which was substantially shorter than that of other metabolites. This GSH-CSI method permits us to address regional differences of GSH in the human brain under conditions where oxidative stress has been implicated, including multiple sclerosis, aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary