NMR in Biomedicine

Cover image for Vol. 25 Issue 12

December 2012

Volume 25, Issue 12

Pages i–ii, 1311–1403

  1. Issue information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. Research articles
    4. Letter to the editor
    1. Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2761

  2. Research articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. Research articles
    4. Letter to the editor
    1. Investigation of the effective connectivity of resting state networks in Alzheimer's disease: a functional MRI study combining independent components analysis and multivariate Granger causality analysis (pages 1311–1320)

      Zhenyu Liu, Yumei Zhang, Lijun Bai, Hao Yan, Ruwei Dai, Chongguang Zhong, Hu Wang, Wenjuan Wei, Ting Xue, Yuanyuan Feng, Youbo You and Jie Tian

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2803

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We employed multivariate Granger causality analysis (mGCA) to evaluate the effective connectivity among the resting state networks (RSNs) detected using independent components analysis in 18 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in 18 age-matched normal controls during the resting state. Patients with AD exhibited weaker causal interactions among the RSNs in both intensity and quantity relative to normal controls. Results from mGCA indicated that the causal interactions involving the default mode network and auditory network were weaker in patients with AD, whereas stronger causal connectivity emerged in relation to the memory network and executive control network

    2. Oxygenation in cervical cancer and normal uterine cervix assessed using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) MRI at 3T (pages 1321–1330)

      Rami R. Hallac, Yao Ding, Qing Yuan, Roderick W. McColl, Jayanthi Lea, Robert D. Sims, Paul T. Weatherall and Ralph P. Mason

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2804

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) contrast MRI is demonstrated in human cervical cancer patients. Dynamic T2*-weighted MRI and quantitative R2* measurements were obtained in response to an oxygen breathing challenge at 3T. Baseline signal intensity was quite stable in cervical tumors, but increased to various extents in tumors providing potential insight into tumor vascular oxygenation.

    3. Blast-induced neurotrauma leads to neurochemical changes and neuronal degeneration in the rat hippocampus (pages 1331–1339)

      Venkata Siva Sai Sujith Sajja, Matthew P. Galloway, Farhad Ghoddoussi, Dhananjeyan Thiruthalinathan, Andrea Kepsel, Kathryn Hay, Cynthia A. Bir and Pamela J. VandeVord

      Article first published online: 1 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2805

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Summary of statistically significant changes in MR-visible neurochemical profiles within hippocampus 24 hours after blast exposure. Creatine, CRE; γ- amino butyric acid, GABA; Glutamate, GLU; Succinate, SUC; Glutathione, GSH; Lactate, LAC; N-acetyl aspartate, NAA; Phosphorylethanolamine, PEA. *p < 0.05, #p = 0.08.

    4. Intracerebral injection of human mesenchymal stem cells impacts cerebral microvasculature after experimental stroke: MRI study (pages 1340–1348)

      Anaïck Moisan, Nicolas Pannetier, Emmanuelle Grillon, Marie-Jeanne Richard, Florence de Fraipont, Chantal Rémy, Emmanuel L. Barbier and Olivier Detante

      Article first published online: 27 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2806

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study evaluates the microvascular changes occurring after a delayed injection of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) to mimic clinical conditions. Using MRI and immunohistology, we compared the vascular parameters (cerebral blood volume, vessel diameter and vascular surface) in the lesion of MCAo rats intracerebrally injected with placebo or hMSCs. One day after intracerebral injection, hMSCs abolished the cerebral blood volume increase observed in the lesion and delayed the vessel size index increase secondary to cerebral ischaemia.

    5. Prediction of pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer using diffusion-weighted imaging and MRS (pages 1349–1359)

      Hee Jung Shin, Hyeon-Man Baek, Jin-Hee Ahn, Seunghee Baek, Hyunji Kim, Joo Hee Cha and Hak Hee Kim

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2807

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We evaluated the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in patients with breast cancer using diffusion-weighted imaging and MRS, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was the only significant parameter at pretreatment in differentiating between pathologic complete response (pCR) and non-pCR. After NAC, the changes in tumor size, MRS parameters and ADC showed significant differences between the two groups. Patients with pCR showed significantly lower pretreatment ADCs than those with non-pCR, and the change in ADC after NAC was the most accurate predictor of pCR.

    6. Manganese-enhanced MRI optic nerve tracking: effect of intravitreal manganese dose on retinal toxicity (pages 1360–1368)

      Lisha Luo, Hui Xu, Ying Li, Zhaodong Du, Xiaodong Sun, Zhizhong Ma and Yuntao Hu

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2808

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The contrast-to-noise ratio of optic nerve increased with increasing concentration of MnCl2 up to 75 mm. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) densities were reduced significantly when the concentration of MnCl2 in the intravitreal injection was equal to or greater than 75 mm. The ribosome number increase in RGCs was first detected at 25 mm of MnCl2. Retinal toxicity of MnCl2 at higher concentration also included mitochondrial destruction, ribosomal disaggregation and cell disruption in RGCs, and damage of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    7. Diffusion abnormalities in temporal lobes of children with temporal lobe epilepsy: a preliminary diffusional kurtosis imaging study and comparison with diffusion tensor imaging (pages 1369–1377)

      Yu Gao, Yuzhen Zhang, Chun-Sing Wong, Po-Man Wu, Zhongping Zhang, Junling Gao, Deqiang Qiu and Bingsheng Huang

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2809

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This preliminary study indicated that diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) is more sensitive than diffusion tensor imaging for the detection of diffusion abnormalities in white and gray matter of temporal lobes of children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), even when electroencephalography (EEG) signals are normal. These findings pave the way for the application of DKI in in-depth studies in children with TLE.

    8. Use of in vivo bioluminescence and MRI to determine hyperthermia-induced changes in luciferase activity under the control of an hsp70 promoter (pages 1378–1391)

      Walter Hundt, Christian Schink, Silke Steinbach, Caitlin E. O'Connell-Rodwell, Dirk Mayer, Mykhaylo Burbelko, Andreas Kießling and Samira Guccione

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2811

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We investigated the in vivo effect of hyperthermia on heat shock protein (Hsp) expression and MRI changes in three tumor cell lines. Three tumor cell lines were transfected with an hsp70_luc plasmid and injected into mice. Tumors were exposed to five different temperatures. hsp70 transcription was strongly induced at 42 and 44 ºC. Correlating with the bioluminescence signal, significant Hsp70 protein production was found. MRI parameters can be used in combination with optical imaging to provide information on hsp70 transcription.

    9. The role of gray and white matter segmentation in quantitative proton MR spectroscopic imaging (pages 1392–1400)

      Assaf Tal, Ivan I. Kirov, Robert I. Grossman and Oded Gonen

      Article first published online: 20 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2812

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The global concentration of brain metabolites varies between gray and white tissue, leading to partial volume effects, which can be accounted for by combining multi-voxel spectroscopy, image segmentation and least squares fitting in post-processing. We showed that unaccounted tissue partial volume can vary absolute quantification by 5-10% (more for ratios), which can often double the sample size required to establish statistical significance. Tissue metabolite concentrations were quantified for 18 healthy volunteers.

  3. Letter to the editor

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. Research articles
    4. Letter to the editor

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION