NMR in Biomedicine

Cover image for Vol. 25 Issue 8

August 2012

Volume 25, Issue 8

Pages i–ii, 953–1014

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Review Articles
    4. Research Articles
    1. Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2757

  2. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Review Articles
    4. Research Articles
    1. Contrast-enhanced MRI of murine myocardial infarction – Part I (pages 953–968)

      Tessa Geelen, Leonie E. M. Paulis, Bram F. Coolen, Klaas Nicolay and Gustav J. Strijkers

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2768

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Murine models of myocardial infarction are widely used to study the pathophysiological processes underlying adverse cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. Contrast-enhanced cardiac MRI offers many readouts to study these processes non-invasively. Part I of this two-part review describes recent applications of non-targeted and targeted probes for contrast-enhanced MRI of murine myocardial infarction.

    2. Contrast-enhanced MRI of murine myocardial infarction – Part II (pages 969–984)

      Bram F. Coolen, Leonie E. M. Paulis, Tessa Geelen, Klaas Nicolay and Gustav J. Strijkers

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2767

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Murine models of myocardial infarction are widely used to study the pathophysiological processes underlying adverse cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. Contrast-enhanced cardiac MRI offers many readouts to study these processes non-invasively. Part II of this two-part review discusses recent developments in MRI sequences design for contrast-enhanced MRI of murine myocardial infarction.

  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Review Articles
    4. Research Articles
    1. Absolute quantification of metabolites in breast cancer cell extracts by quantitative 2D 1H INADEQUATE NMR (pages 985–992)

      Estelle Martineau, Illa Tea, Serge Akoka and Patrick Giraudeau

      Version of Record online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.1816

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      A quantitative 2D 1H INADEQUATE NMR experiment is presented to accurately and unambiguously measure absolute metabolite concentrations in complex biological mixtures. This protocol, which offers an excellent analytical performance, is applied to the quantitative study of breast cancer cell extracts. It reveals significant concentration differences between cell lines, thus offering a powerful discrimination method and a high capacity to identify and quantify biomarkers in cell extracts, and more generally in biological samples.

    2. Fast volumetric imaging of ethanol metabolism in rat liver with hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate (pages 993–999)

      Sonal Josan, Daniel Spielman, Yi-Fen Yen, Ralph Hurd, Adolf Pfefferbaum and Dirk Mayer

      Version of Record online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2762

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      This work demonstrates fast volumetric imaging of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products in vivo using spiral MRSI, acquiring a volume of 80 × 80 × 60 mm3 with a nominal isotropic resolution of 5 mm in 4.5 s on a clinical 3-T scanner. The method was applied to measure the changes in pyruvate to lactate conversion after the infusion of ethanol. Dynamic three-dimensional 13C MRSI can provide improved rate constant estimates by allowing the analysis of spectra from organ-specific regions of interest.

    3. Three-dimensional arbitrary voxel shapes in spectroscopy with submillisecond TEs (pages 1000–1006)

      Jeff Snyder, Martin Haas, Iulius Dragonu, Jürgen Hennig and Maxim Zaitsev

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2764

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      A three-dimensional spectroscopic method for arbitrary, anatomically shaped voxel localization and submillisecond TEs was developed for in vivo 1H MRS. Following the development of an efficient broad bandwidth excitation k-space trajectory, the method was tested in phantom and human brain experiments. Eight metabolites were detected with significant accuracy in vivo at a TE of 935 µs, and phantom investigations showed suppression of outer volume signals by 1434 and 2246 (using parallel excitation) times, resulting in excellent spatial selectivity.

    4. Manipulation of cortical gray matter oxygenation by hyperoxic respiratory challenge: field dependence of R2* and MR signal response (pages 1007–1014)

      Cristina Rossi, Andreas Boss, Olivio F. Donati, Roger Luechinger, Spyridon S. Kollias, Antonios Valavanis, Juerg Hodler and Daniel Nanz

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/nbm.2775

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      In this study, the R2* response of the cortical gray matter to respiratory challenges was quantified at 1.5, 3 and 7 T. Hyperoxic challenges resulted in a decrease in the relaxation rate at all field strengths. The response to hyperoxic hypercapnia was 1.3 times larger than to hyperoxia. Both challenges led to a quadratic increase in the R2* response with B0. High field strengths may allow the probing of oxygen physiology in clinical settings.

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