Cell lines in inner ear research

Authors

  • Marcelo N. Rivolta,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biomedical Science, Institute of Molecular Physiology, University of Sheffield, Alfred Denny Building, Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TN, United Kingdom
    • Department of Biomedical Science, Institute of Molecular Physiology, University of Sheffield, Alfred Denny Building, Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TN, United Kingdom
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  • Matthew C. Holley

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biomedical Science, Institute of Molecular Physiology, University of Sheffield, Alfred Denny Building, Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TN, United Kingdom
    • Department of Biomedical Science, Institute of Molecular Physiology, University of Sheffield, Alfred Denny Building, Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TN, United Kingdom
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Abstract

Cell lines have provided important experimental tools that have enhanced our understanding of neural and sensory function. They are particularly valuable in inner ear research because the auditory and vestibular systems are small, complex, and encased in several layers of bone. Organotypic cultures provide an invaluable experimental resource but require repeated microdissection and culture, and remain complex in terms of cell types and states of differentiation. A number of laboratories have established cell lines that offer a range of potential applications to hearing research. This review describes the advances that have already been made with these lines and the potential applications that they offer in the future. The majority of the cell lines are immortalized with a conditionally expressed, temperature sensitive variant of the SV40 tumor antigen. We discuss the value of these cells in developmental studies. © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Neurobiol 53: 306–318, 2002

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