A review of inner ear fate maps and cell lineage studies

Authors

  • Sung-Hee Kil,

    1. Leslie and Susan Gonda (Goldschmied) Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, House Ear Institute, 2100 West Third St., Los Angeles, California 90057
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Andres Collazo

    Corresponding author
    1. Leslie and Susan Gonda (Goldschmied) Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, House Ear Institute, 2100 West Third St., Los Angeles, California 90057
    • Leslie and Susan Gonda (Goldschmied) Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, House Ear Institute, 2100 West Third St., Los Angeles, California 90057
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

A renewed interest in the development of the inner ear has provided more data on the fate and cell lineage relationships of the tissues making up this complex structure. The inner ear develops from a simple ectodermal thickening of the head called the otic placode, which undergoes a great deal of growth and differentiation to form a multichambered nonsensory epithelium that houses the six to nine sensory organs of the inner ear. Despite a large number of studies examining otic development, there have been surprisingly few fate maps generated. The published fate maps encompass four species and range from preotic to otocyst stages. Although some of these studies were consistent with a compartment and boundary model, other studies reveal extensive cell mixing during development. Cell lineage studies have been done in fewer species. At the single cell level the resulting clones in both chicks and frogs appear somewhat restricted in terms of distribution. We conclude that up until late placode stages there are no clear lineage restriction boundaries, meaning that cells seem to mix extensively at these early stages. At late placode stages, when the otic cup has formed, there are at least two boundaries located dorsally in the forming otocyst but none ventrally. These conclusions are consistent with all the fate maps and reconciles the chick and frog data. These results suggest that genes involved in patterning the inner ear may have dynamic and complex expression patterns. © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Neurobiol 53: 129–142, 2002

Ancillary