Non-planar 3D crack growth by the extended finite element and level sets—Part II: Level set update

Authors

  • A. Gravouil,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208, U.S.A.
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    • Laboratoire de Mécanique des Solides, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon, 34 Av. des Arts, 69621 Villeurbanne, France

  • N. Moës,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208, U.S.A.
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    • Laboratoire de Mécanique et Matériaux, Ecole Centrale de Nantes, 1 Rue de la Noe, 44321 Nantes, France

  • T. Belytschko

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208, U.S.A.
    • Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 N. Sheridan, Evanston, IL 60208, U.S.A.
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Abstract

We present a level set method for treating the growth of non-planar three-dimensional cracks.The crack is defined by two almost-orthogonal level sets (signed distance functions). One of them describes the crack as a two-dimensional surface in a three-dimensional space, and the second is used to describe the one-dimensional crack front, which is the intersection of the two level sets. A Hamilton–Jacobi equation is used to update the level sets. A velocity extension is developed that preserves the old crack surface and can accurately generate the growing surface. The technique is coupled with the extended finite element method which approximates the displacement field with a discontinuous partition of unity. This displacement field is constructed directly in terms of the level sets, so the discretization by finite elements requires no explicit representation of the crack surface. Numerical experiments show the robustness of the method, both in accuracy and in treating cracks with significant changes in topology. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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