Self-report quality of life as a predictor of hospitalization for patients with LV dysfunction: A life course approach

Authors

  • Donald E. Stull,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Adult Health Nursing, School of Nursing, University of Maryland, 655 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1579
    • Department of Adult Health Nursing, School of Nursing, University of Maryland, 655 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1579.
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    • *

      Associate Professor and Senior Researcher.

  • Lynn A. Clough,

    1. Department of Sociology, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-1905
    2. Department of Medicine, Summa Health System, Akron, OH 44304-1968
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    • Doctoral Student.

  • Daniel Van Dussen

    1. Doctoral Program in Gerontology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201-1596
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    • Doctoral Student.


  • An earlier version of this article was presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Health Services Research, Los Angeles, June 2000. The authors thank Dr. Nalini Jairath, Dr. Linda Stull, and three anonymous reviewers for comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript.

Abstract

For this secondary data analysis of a large clinical drug study, researchers investigated the independent prognostic utility of self-report quality-of-life measures versus clinical measures for assessing patient risk for heart-failure-related hospitalization. The experience of heart failure varies over the life course; hence, four age groups were investigated. Quality-of-life measures, specifically health-related quality-of-life and psychosocial quality-of-life measures, were found to be independent and significant predictors of heart-failure-related hospitalizations, as compared to traditional clinical indicators. In addition, the psychosocial quality-of-life measure varied by age group in its importance as a predictor of hospitalization, suggesting differential relevance over the life course. Specifically, psychosocial quality of life was most strongly predictive of hospitalization for those ages 21–44, was less predictive for those ages 45–54, and was nonsignificant for those 55–64 years of age and those 65 and over. Including self-report quality-of-life measures provides a more complete picture of the factors associated with risk of hospitalization at different points in the life course for individuals with heart failure. These findings suggest that researchers and practitioners could use self-report quality-of-life measures as additional prognostic indicators of a patient's condition and risk for heart-failure-related hospitalization, especially for younger patients. © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Res Nurs Health 24:460–469, 2001

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