Stress-related influences on blood pressure in African American women

Authors

  • Mary S. Webb,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of South Florida College of Nursing, Tampa, FL 33612-4799
    • University of South Florida College of Nursing, MDC Box 22, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612-4799.
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Associate Professor

  • Jason W. Beckstead

    1. University of South Florida College of Nursing, Tampa, FL 33612-4799
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Assistant Professor


  • The authors gratefully acknowledge the cooperation of the James A. Haley Veterans Hospital, Tampa, Florida, and Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc., Tampa, Florida, for their assistance and in-kind donations.

Abstract

The relationship of blood pressure status to three stress-related variables, anger, coping resources, and strain, was evaluated in 90 African American women. The majority of the participants (57%) were normotensive, 32% of the participants reported current use of hypertensive medication, and an additional 16% had a mean blood pressure greater than 140/90 mmHg but were not on hypertensive therapy. From an analysis using ANCOVA, participants in the latter group were found to have significantly higher scores on rational-cognitive coping resources, controlling for age, waist/hip ratio, and pack-years. No significant differences among the blood pressure groups were found in anger or personal strain. Fostering rational-cognitive coping skills, which represent the ability to problem-solve effectively and to set priorities, may be beneficial for African American women and should be evaluated further in a larger sample. © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 25:383–393, 2002

Ancillary