Determinants of physical activity and adherence to a 24-week home-based walking program in African American and Caucasian women

Authors

  • JoEllen Wilbur,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Public Health, Mental Health and Administrative Nursing, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
    • University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing (M/C 802), 845 South Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL 60612.
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    • Professor.

  • Arlene Michaels Miller,

    1. Department of Public Health, Mental Health and Administrative Nursing, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
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    • Associate Professor.

  • Peggy Chandler,

    1. Department of Public Health, Mental Health and Administrative Nursing, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
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    • Research Assistant Professor.

  • Judith McDevitt

    1. Department of Public Health, Mental Health and Administrative Nursing, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
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    • Clinical Assistant Professor.


  • Cheryl L. Cox, Associate Faculty, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, was a consultant on the project.

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to: (a) identify which determinants of physical activity among African American and Caucasian women predict adherence to a 24-week home-based walking program; and (b) explore differences between African American and Caucasian women. Participants were 153 working women who were sedentary at leisure. The program included an exercise prescription, instructions, and support. Background determinants included demographics, previous exercise experience, and social role influences. Intrapersonal determinants (self-efficacy, self-determinism) were measured at baseline and 24 weeks. Adherence was measured with heart rate monitors and logs. Adherence was significantly higher in Caucasians, those with less previous exercise experience, and those with higher self-efficacy. Findings suggest that adherence to a walking program is influenced by multiple factors including background and intrapersonal determinants of physical activity. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 26: 213–224, 2003

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