Biochemical hypoglycemia in female nurses during clinical shift work

Authors

  • Kayoko Inoue,

    1. Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
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    • MD, MPH and PhD candidate.

  • Yuko Kakehashi,

    1. Kansai Rousai Hospital, Inaba-so 3-1-69, Amagasaki City, Hyogo, Japan
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    • Associate Director of Nurses.

  • Suiko Oomori,

    1. Kansai Rousai Hospital, Inaba-so 3-1-69, Amagasaki City, Hyogo, Japan
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    • Director of Nurses.

  • Akio Koizumi

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
    • Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Yoshida Konoe-cho Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan.
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    • Professor.


  • We thank F. Takagi (Chubu Rousai Hospital), K. Ohsawa (Niigata Rousai Hospital), and I. Igarashi (Yokohama Rousai Hospital) for data collection.

Abstract

Female nurses in Japan commonly experience symptoms similar to those of hypoglycemia while working. Biochemical hypoglycemia can lead to impaired cognition; thus, it is important to know the prevalence of biochemical hypoglycemia among nurses. Five hundred and sixty-eight female nurses (53% of the target population) in four hospitals completed questionnaires. They determined their blood glucose levels 12 times, at four points during three shifts. Fifty-seven nurses (10%) recorded biochemical hypoglycemia (≤3.0 mM) at least once. Multivariate analysis revealed three independent risk factors for hypoglycemia: higher coefficient of variation of blood glucose level, lower body mass index, and not smoking. Subjective symptoms were not associated with hypoglycemia. More research on hypoglycemia is needed in order to improve working environment for nurses. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 27:87–96, 2004

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