Severity of fecal incontinence in community-living elderly in a health maintenance organization

Authors

  • Donna Zimmaro Bliss,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 5–160 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455
    • University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 5–101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
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    • Associate Professor and Professor in Long-Term Care of Elders.

  • Lucy Rose Fischer,

    1. HealthPartners Research Foundation, Minneapolis, MN
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    • Senior Investigator.

  • Kay Savik,

    1. University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 5–160 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455
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    • Biostatistician.

  • Melissa Avery,

    1. University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 5–160 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455
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    • Associate Professor and Director of Midwifery Nursing.

  • Peter Mark

    1. HealthPartners Medical Group, Minneapolis, MN
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    • Obstetrician and Gynecologist.


  • The authors thank Dr. Veronica Roseneau, Heather Neren-Smith, and the HMO clinic staff for assistance in implementing the study, Gerald H. Amundson for programming and searching databases, and Karen Paulsen for designing the logo for the survey.

Abstract

An anonymous survey containing questions about the severity of fecal incontinence (FI)—frequency, amount, and type—and its correlates was distributed to community-living elderly at four managed-care clinics. Completed surveys were received from 1,352 respondents whose mean (±standard deviation) age was 75 ± 6 years and 60% of whom were female. Approximately 19% reported having FI one or more times within the past year. Incontinence that soiled underwear or was of loose or liquid consistency was most common. More frequent FI and a greater amount of FI were significantly associated with loose or liquid stool consistency, defecation urgency, bowel surgery, and chronic health conditions. Therapies aimed at normalizing stool consistency or reducing urgency may be beneficial in lessening FI severity. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 27:162–173, 2004

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