Indomethacin and ibuprofen preserve gastrocnemius muscle mass in mice bearing the colon-26 adenocarcinoma

Authors

  • Donna O. McCarthy,

    Corresponding author
    1. National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
    2. University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Nursing, Madison, WI
    • National Institute of Nursing Research, 31 Center Drive, Room 5B13, Bethesda, MD 20892-2178.
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    • Adjunct Investigator.

    • Professor.

  • Pamela Whitney,

    1. University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Nursing, Madison, WI
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    • Graduate Student.

  • Andrew Hitt,

    1. National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
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    • Research Assistant.

  • Sadeeka Al-Majid

    1. Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing
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    • Assistant Professor.


  • The authors gratefully acknowledge the skilled technical assistance of Ms. Emily Clements and thank Mr. Christopher Ruthers for the preparation of tables and illustrations.

Abstract

Skeletal muscle wasting is a prominent feature of cancer cachexia and involves decreased muscle protein synthesis and increased activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. We report that both indomethacin and ibuprofen improved body weight and weight of the gastrocnemius muscle in tumor-bearing mice. Ibuprofen increased the soluble protein content of the muscle without affecting muscle levels of phosphorylated p70 S6 kinase, a ribosomal kinase involved in protein synthesis. Paradoxically, indomethacin increased levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins. Further study is needed to understand the mechanism of action by which indomethacin and ibuprofen preserve body weight and muscle mass in the tumor-bearing mice. The data suggest that ibuprofen may have beneficial effects in the treatment of cancer cachexia. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 27:174–184, 2004

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