Postpartum depression and related psychosocial variables in Hong Kong Chinese women: Findings from a prospective study

Authors

  • Sharron S.K. Leung,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Nursing Studies, The University of Hong Kong, Room 11, 4/F, Academic and Administration Block, Faculty of Medicine Building, 21 Sassoon Road, Hong Kong
    • Department of Nursing Studies, The University of Hong Kong, Room 11, 4/F, Academic and Administration Block, Faculty of Medicine Building, 21 Sassoon Road, Hong Kong.
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    • Assistant Professor.

  • Ida M. Martinson,

    1. Department of Family Health Care Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0606
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    • Professor.

  • David Arthur

    1. School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
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    • Professor.


  • The authors thank Dr. Joyce Hopkins, Dr. Carolyn Cutrona, Dr. Cynthia M. Logsdon, Dr. Sheldon Cohen, and John Cox for their instruments and Dr. Dominic Lee for his translated Chinese version of the EPDS.

Abstract

Research on predictors of postpartum depression (PPD) in Hong Kong (HK) Chinese women is scant. A prospective study with 385 HK Chinese postpartum women was conducted to identify correlations between PPD and demographic variables, and antenatal depression and psychosocial variables, and to determine which of these variables were predictors of PPD. Using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), we classified 19.8% of participants as postnatally depressed. Fifty-six percent of the variance in PPD was explained by social support and stress factors. However, social support factors accounted for only a small percentage of that variance. The major predictors were antenatal depression, postnatal perceived stress, and childcare stress. HK women may benefit from a culturally appropriate intervention focused on reducing stress in the postpartum period. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 28:27–38, 2005

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