Positive and negative depression coping in low-income African American women

Authors

  • Linda Denise Oakley,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Clinical Science Center, Madison, WI
    • University of Wisconsin-Madison, Clinical Science Center, K6/356, 600 Highland Ave., Madison, WI 53792-2455.
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    • Associate Professor of Nursing.

  • Mi-Kyung Song,

    1. University of Pittsburgh, Victoria Building, Pittsburgh, PA
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    • Assistant Professor of Nursing.

  • Michelle DeBose-McQuirter

    1. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Center for Women's Health Research, Madison, WI
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    • PhD Student.


  • The authors thank Seong-Yi Baik, PhD, RN, CNAA, University of Cincinnati, for theoretical contributions to the research, Rick P. Voland, PhD, UW-Madison Senior Research Specialist, and UW-Madison School of Nursing graduate students Diane Pivonka, Joelle Fellinger, and Miriam Ezenwa for their contributions to the manuscript and data collection.

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to examine positive and negative depression coping (DC) in low-income African American women. Because low-income African American women have been shown to be vulnerable to depression symptom onset yet less accepting of treatment, DC in this population is of interest to researchers. Depression symptom severity, defense mechanisms, difficult life circumstances (DLC), and social support were examined as possible determinants of DC. In 244 mildly or moderately to severely depressed women, mature defense mechanisms predicted positive DC, and DLC predicted negative DC. Social support had no effect on positive or negative DC. Findings are discussed in terms of individual and community tailored rehabilitative psychotherapy to promote positive DC. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 28:106–116, 2005

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