Unraveling smoking ties: How tobacco use is embedded in couple interactions

Authors

  • Joan L. Bottorff,

    Corresponding author
    1. Nursing and Health Behavior Research Unit, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia
    • Professor and CIHR Investigator, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, T201 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 2B5.
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    • Professor, CIHR Investigator, Distinguished University Scholar.

  • Cecilia Kalaw,

    1. Nursing and Health Behavior Research Unit, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia
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    • Social Science Researcher.

  • Joy L. Johnson,

    1. Nursing and Health Behavior Research Unit, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia
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    • Professor and CIHR Investigator.

  • Natalie Chambers,

    1. Nursing and Health Behavior Research Unit, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia
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    • Doctoral Student.

  • Miriam Stewart,

    1. Faculty of Medicine and Public Health, University of Alberta
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    • Professor.

  • Lorraine Greaves,

    1. British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, BC Women's Hospital and Women's Health Centre, and Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia
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    • Executive Director and Clinical Professor.

  • Mary Kelly

    1. Nursing and Health Behavior Research Unit, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia
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    • Social Science Researcher.


Abstract

The purpose of this research was to explore couple interactions related to tobacco use prior to pregnancy, as part of a larger grounded theory project focused on couple interactions related to tobacco use. Interviews with 28 women who quit or reduced smoking for pregnancy and their partners were conducted. Analysis of retrospective accounts of pre-index pregnancy interactions resulted in the identification of tobacco-related routines related to: (a) regulation of smoking; (b) practices related to the acquisition, use and handling of tobacco; (c) communication about tobacco use; and (d) responding to slips and lapses. Variations in the enactment of routines were captured in three tobacco-related interaction patterns: (a) disengaged; (b) conflictual; and (c) accommodating. Findings provide insights into the role tobacco plays in relationships and resistance to behavior change. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 28:316–328, 2005

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