Relationship between nursing interventions and outcome achievement in acute care settings

Authors

  • Diane Doran,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
    2. Nursing Health Services Research Unit, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1P8, Canada
    • 155 College St., Room 215, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1P8, Canada.
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    • Professor, Associate Dean of Research and International Relations.

  • Margaret B. Harrison,

    1. Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Nursing, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada
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    • Associate Professor.

  • Heather Laschinger,

    1. Nursing Health Services Research Unit, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1P8, Canada
    2. School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
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    • Professor, Associate Director of Research.

  • John Hirdes,

    1. Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
    2. Scientific Director, Homewood Research Institute, Guelph, ON, Canada
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    • Professor.

  • Ellen Rukholm,

    1. School of Nursing, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada
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    • Professor and Director and faculty member of the Centre for Rural and Northern Health.

  • Souraya Sidani,

    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
    2. Nursing Health Services Research Unit, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1P8, Canada
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    • Professor.

  • Linda McGillis Hall,

    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
    2. Nursing Health Services Research Unit, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1P8, Canada
    3. New Investigator, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canada
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    • Associate Professor.

  • Ann E. Tourangeau,

    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
    2. Nursing Health Services Research Unit, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1P8, Canada
    3. Adjunct Scientist, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Ontario, Co-investigator, Nursing Health Services Research Unit, Career Scientist, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care
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    • Assistant Professor.

  • Lisa Cranley

    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
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  • We acknowledge Peggy White, University of Toronto, Project coordinator, and the following individuals who were regional project coordinators: Jennifer Carryer, University of Toronto; Joan Almost, University of Western Ontario; Elaine Friedberg, Ottawa, Ontario; Renée St. Onge, Laurentian University; and Nancy Curtin-Telegdi, University of Waterloo. We acknowledge Jeff Poss for his invaluable support in data analysis. The opinions contained in this paper are those of the author and no official endorsement by the MOHLTC is implied or should be inferred.

Abstract

The extent to which nursing interventions provided during hospitalization are associated with patients' therapeutic self-care and functional health outcomes was explored with a voluntary sample of 574 patients. Nurses collected data on patient outcomes at admission and discharge using the minimum data set (MDS) and the therapeutic self-care scale (TSCS). Research assistants audited charts for documentation of nursing interventions. The results indicated that nursing interventions aimed at exercise promotion, positioning, and self-care assistance predicted functional status outcome. Higher functional status outcome predicted therapeutic self-care ability at hospital discharge. The results demonstrate that nurses can use MDS and TSCS data on patient outcomes to gain insight into the effectiveness of their interventions. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 29:61–70, 2006

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