A comparison of pressure ulcer prevalence rates in nursing homes in the Netherlands and Germany, adjusted for population characteristics

Authors

  • Antje Tannen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for the Humanities and Health Sciences, Department of Nursing Science, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    • Charité Berlin, CCM, Institut für Medizin-/Pflegepädagogik und Pflegewissenschaft, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
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    • Research Assistant, PhD-Student.

  • Gerrie Bours,

    1. Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health Care Studies, Section of Nursing Studies, Universiteit Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    2. University of Professional Education Zuyd, Heerlen, The Netherlands
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    • Assistant Professor.

  • Ruud Halfens,

    1. Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health Care Studies, Section of Nursing Studies, Universiteit Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
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    • Associate Professor.

  • Theo Dassen

    1. Centre for the Humanities and Health Sciences, Department of Nursing Science, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
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    • Professor.


  • The authors thank all participating facilities in the Netherlands and Germany for their cooperation.

Abstract

Annual pressure ulcer surveys in the Netherlands and Germany have shown remarkable differences in prevalence rates. We explored the differences between the two populations, and the degree to which these differences were associated with differences in prevalence. To this end, data from 48 Dutch and 45 German facilities (n = 9772) from 2003 were analyzed. The prevalence of pressure ulcers (excluding grade 1) was 12.5% in the Netherlands and 4.3% in Germany. After adjusting for age, sex, and other risk factors, the probability of developing a pressure ulcer of stage 2 or higher in Dutch nursing homes was three times greater than in German homes. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 29: 588–596, 2006

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