African Americans and diabetes: Spiritual role of the health care provider in self-management

Authors

  • Rebecca L. Polzer

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Nursing, 6901 Bertner Ave. Room 782, Houston, TX 77096
    • University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Nursing, 6901 Bertner Ave. Room 782, Houston, TX 77096.
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    • Assistant Professor.


  • The author wishes to acknowledge the contributions of Dr. Jane Mahoney, DSN, APRN, BC and Dr. Marlene Cohen, RN, PhD, FAAN as well as support from predoctoral institutional (T32 NR07091) and predoctoral individual (1 F31NR008313-01A2) National Research Service Awards funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research.

Abstract

How African Americans with type 2 diabetes perceive the spiritual role of health care providers (HCPs) and the effects of that role on self-management was explored using a qualitative descriptive analysis. The sample consisted of 29 African American men and women ages 40–75 with type 2 diabetes and 5 ministers of African American churches. A spiritual relationship with their health provider was important in helping participants manage their diabetes. Three typologies from a parent study were expanded with a focus in this extended study on the meaning ascribed to spiritual relationships with providers and the impact of these relationships on self-management. Care perceived as spiritual may be an important component of providing culturally sensitive health care to African Americans and may facilitate their self-management. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 30: 164–174, 2007

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