Assessment of caregivers' willingness to participate in an intervention research study

Authors

  • Margaret R. Murphy,

    1. University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, TX
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    • Research Assistant Professor.

  • Monica I. Escamilla,

    1. University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, TX
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    • Graduate Assistant, Acute Nursing.

  • Paula H. Blackwell,

    1. University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, TX
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    • Senior Research Assistant, Acute Nursing.

  • Kathy T. Lucke,

    1. University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX
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    • Associate Professor.

    • Associate Dean for Academic Programs.

  • Denise Miner-Williams,

    1. University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, TX
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    • Graduate Assistant, Acute Nursing.

  • Virginia Shaw,

    1. University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, TX
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    • Clinical Assistant Professor at School of Nursing.

  • Sharon L. Lewis

    Corresponding author
    1. Schools of Nursing and Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX
    2. South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, TX
    • GRECC 182, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, 7400 Merton Minter Blvd., San Antonio, TX 78229.
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    • Professor.

    • Clinical Nurse Scientist.


Abstract

The purpose of the study was to identify factors that influenced family caregivers' decisions to participate in an intervention research study. In interviews conducted before and after the intervention, caregivers (n=21) described reasons for participation. A focused content analysis was used to examine responses. Themes that emerged included: (a) caregivers recognized a need for help; (b) expectations and motivations toward change; (c) recognition of self worth as caregivers; (d) timeliness of recruitment strategies; (e) support of research staff affected recruitment; and (f) caregivers recognized the benefits of participation. These findings support the importance of many different strategies for effective recruitment of caregivers in future studies. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 30: 347–355, 2007

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