Olfactory and gustatory sensory changes to tobacco smoke in pregnant smokers

Authors

  • Pamela K. Pletsch,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
    Current affiliation:
    1. University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.
    • School of Nursing University of Wisconsin Madison, Box 2455, K6/344 CSC, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792-2455.
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    • Professor.

  • Kathryn I. Pollak,

    1. Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program; Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
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    • Associate Professor.

  • Bercedis L. Peterson,

    1. Department of Biostatistics and Informatics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
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    • Associate Research Professor.

  • Jeongok Park,

    1. School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
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    • Research Assistant.

  • Cheryl A. Oncken,

    1. Department of Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Hartford, CT
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    • Associate Clinical Professor.

  • Geeta K. Swamy,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
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    • Assistant Professor.

  • Pauline Lyna

    1. Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention, Detection and Control Research Program; Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
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    • Statistician.


Abstract

Models of smoking behavior change include addiction, social, and behavioral concepts. The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of two biologic factors, olfactory and gustatory responses to tobacco smoke, as potentially powerful contributors to smoking behavior change among pregnant women. Data were obtained from 209 pregnant smokers. The majority of women reported olfactory (62%) and gustatory (53%) aversions to tobacco. Aversions first appeared during the first trimester of pregnancy. Women who experienced olfactory aversions were more likely also to experience gustatory aversions. Olfactory aversions were associated with women smoking less. Aversions to tobacco smoke are common among pregnant smokers, are associated with women smoking less, and could help explain pregnant women's smoking patterns. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 31:31–41, 2008

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