Parents' perspectives on having their children interviewed for research

Authors

  • Emily K. Hadley,

    1. University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
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    • Project Director.

  • Carrol A.M. Smith,

    1. School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
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    • Postdoctoral Research Fellow.

  • Agatha M. Gallo,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Maternal Child Nursing, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, M/C 802, 845 S. Damen Ave., Chicago, IL 60612
    • Department of Maternal Child Nursing, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, M/C 802, 845 S. Damen Ave., Chicago, IL 60612.
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    • Professor.

  • Denise B. Angst,

    1. Advocate Center for Pediatric Research, Advocate Health Care, Park Ridge, IL
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    • Director.

  • Kathleen A. Knafl

    1. School of Nursing, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
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    • Elisabeth N. Gray Distinguished Professor and Senior Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Affairs.


  • The authors acknowledge Dr. Suzanne Feetham for her ongoing consultation on this research and critical review of the article. A special thanks to all the parents who participated in this study.

Abstract

We describe parents' perspectives on research interviews with their children with single gene conditions. One hundred forty-two parents were interviewed between 2002 and 2003 in a larger study using a qualitative descriptive design. Two questions from the semi-structured interview guide were used to identify parents' perspectives about future interviews. Almost all of the parents said they would allow an interview with their children, but some parents specified stipulations. These stipulations included: focusing on age-appropriate information, limiting information with child, considering input from parents, and providing a child-oriented environment. Knowing this information, researchers can prepare to work more collaboratively with parents and include them more fully in the research process. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 31:4–11, 2008

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