Effectiveness of teaching an early parenting approach within a community-based support service for adolescent mothers

Authors

  • Jane E. Drummond,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    • Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
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    • Professor.

  • Nicole Letourneau,

    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of New Brunswick, New Brunswick, Canada
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    • Associate Professor.

  • Susan M. Neufeld,

    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    2. Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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    • Graduate Student.

    • Canadian Institutes of Health Research Strategic Training Fellow in Canadian Child Health Clinician Scientist Program.

  • Miriam Stewart,

    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    2. Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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    • Professor.

  • Angela Weir

    1. Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, Alberta, Canada
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    • Patient Care Manager.


Abstract

A single blind, pre-test, post-test design was used to test the effectiveness of the Keys to Caregiving Program in enhancing adolescent mother–infant interactions. Participants were sequentially allocated to groups in order of referral. The outcome was the enhancement of maternal and infant behaviors that exhibited mutual responsiveness as measured by the Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale. Issues with recruitment and collaboration with the community agencies made achieving a desirable sample size difficult. Pre-tests and post-tests were completed for 13 participants. While the sample size was insufficient to confidently establish whether or not the Keys to Caregiving produced a between groups treatment effect, mothers within the treatment group evidenced significantly greater contingent responsiveness over time than those within the control group. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 31:12–22, 2008

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