Focus groups as an intervention for low-income African American smokers to promote participation in subsequent intervention studies

Authors

  • Monica S. Webb

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, Center for Health and Behavior, Syracuse University, 430 Huntington Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244-2340
    • Department of Psychology, Center for Health and Behavior, Syracuse University, 430 Huntington Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244-2340.
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    • Assistant Professor.


  • This study was supported by Syracuse University. The author thanks the Syracuse Community Health Center for its assistance with participant recruitment and providing the site for the focus groups. Special thanks to Joan Francis, LCSW, Frankie B. Quarles, D.O., Bill Hines, M.D., Diane L. Brown, Loren Sutton, Marsha Whitley, and AmeriCorps members Stephanie Montgomery and Cynthia Bundy for their helpful suggestions and conducting the study.

Abstract

African Americans are often underrepresented in smoking cessation research. Focus groups were examined as an intervention to increase readiness to quit smoking, the processes of change, and the odds of randomized clinical trial (RCT) participation of non-treatment-seeking, low-income African American smokers. Ten focus groups were conducted. Smokers completed baseline and/or post-group assessments of readiness to quit, the processes of change, and focus group quality. Significant increases were discerned in readiness to quit smoking and the processes of change. Seventy-six percent of participants enrolled in a self-help RCT, which was associated with readiness to quit smoking and plans to set a quit date. One-session focus groups among low-income African American smokers appear to facilitate cognitive changes and participation in RCTs. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 31:141–151, 2008

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