The relationship of nursing staff to the hospitalization of nursing home residents§

Authors

  • Frederic H. Decker

    Corresponding author
    1. National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 3435, Hyattsville, MD 20782
    • National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 3435, Hyattsville, MD 20782.
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  • This is a U.S. Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  • The views presented in this paper are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the government agency or its officials.

  • §

    The author thanks Robin Remsburg, Sandra Decker, Anita Bercovitz, and Jennifer Madans at the National Center for Health Statistics, as well as the reviewers of Research in Nursing and Health, for their comments on earlier versions of the manuscript.

Abstract

Researchers have found registered nurse (RN) staffing unrelated to the prevention of hospitalizations of nursing home residents. Although most nursing home admissions are from hospitals, their studies involved residents who probably were not admitted from hospitals. In this study I examined data on 6,623 discharges of nursing home residents admitted or not admitted from a hospital. For patients with longer stays (>30 days), higher RN staffing levels in nursing homes reduced hospitalizations only for residents admitted from hospitals. Higher RN levels reduced hospitalizations more than higher licensed nurse levels or skill mix. Only among longer-stay residents not admitted from hospitals was RN staffing unrelated to hospitalizations. Researchers may have found RN staffing unrelated to hospitalizations because samples were primarily longer-stay residents not admitted from hospitals. Published 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 31:238–251, 2008

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