Development of an instrument to assess perceived self-efficacy in the parents of infants

Authors

  • Rudi Črnčec,

    Corresponding author
    1. MARCS Auditory Laboratories, University of Western Sydney, Milperra, NSW, Australia
    2. Infant Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Research Unit, Sydney South West Area Health Service, Australia
    • Infant Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Research Unit, Sydney South West Area Health Service, Liverpool Hospital, Mental Health Centre (Level 1: ICAMHS), Locked Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871, Australia.
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    • Clinical Psychologist.

  • Bryanne Barnett,

    1. Karitane, Caring for Families, Carramar, NSW, Australia
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    • Senior Perinatal and Infant Psychiatrist.

  • Stephen Matthey

    1. Infant Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Research Unit, Sydney South West Area Health Service, Australia
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    • Senior Clinical Psychologist.


  • The authors would like to acknowledge the staff at Karitane, Fiona Jameson, Steve Roach, and Edwina Curtis for their assistance in conducting this research. The comments of three anonymous reviewers were also greatly appreciated.

Abstract

In addition to research applications, the measurement of perceived parental self-efficacy (PPSE) could be useful clinically in screening for parenting difficulties, targeting interventions, and evaluating outcomes. In this research we examined the psychometric properties of the Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale (KPCS), a new 15-item PPSE measure. A no-problem control group and three clinical groups comprising 187 mothers with infants were recruited. The KPCS showed acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .81), test–retest reliability (r = .88), and discriminant and convergent validity. A cut-off score was determined, and the scale's sensitivity and positive predictive power was 86% and 88%, respectively. The KPCS may prove a useful addition to tools for the assessment of parents and infants presenting to clinical services. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 31:442–453, 2008

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