Measuring blood pressure knowledge and self-care behaviors of African Americans

Authors

  • Rosalind M. Peters,

    Corresponding author
    1. Adult Health, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, 5557 Cass Ave., Room 358, Detroit, MI 48202
    • Adult Health, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, 5557 Cass Ave., Room 358, Detroit, MI 48202.
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    • Associate Professor.

  • Thomas N. Templin

    1. Research, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
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    • Associate Professor.


Abstract

The purpose of this study was to develop and conduct preliminary psychometric assessment of instruments measuring knowledge and self-care practices regarding behaviors needed for blood pressure (BP) control among African Americans. Items were empirically derived and scored on a 7-point, bipolar scale. The instruments were evaluated in a sample of 306 community-dwelling African Americans. Results revealed acceptable reliability and validity of the BP Knowledge Scale. Results for the BP Self-Care Scale were mixed. A structural equation model of these scales, recorded BP, and covariates fit well. There was an unexpected positive correlation between self-care and BP suggesting a potential bi-directional relationship. The scales demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties and, with minor revisions, may have clinical utility as measures of BP knowledge and self-care. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 31:543–552, 2008

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