Effect of a creative-bonding intervention on Taiwanese nursing students' self-transcendence and attitudes toward elders

Authors

  • Shiue Chen,

    1. National Tainan Institute of Nursing, Tianan, Taiwan
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    • Assistant Professor.

  • Sandra M. Walsh

    Corresponding author
    1. Barry University College of Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, 11300 N. E. 2nd Avenue, Miami Shores, FL 33161
    • Barry University College of Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, 11300 N. E. 2nd Avenue, Miami Shores, FL 33161.
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    • Professor.


  • The authors thank the following: the National Tainan Institute of Nursing students who participated in this study; Ms. Jiin-Luan Hsieh, the teacher of the long-term care course; the Lambda Chi Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International for partial funding; Dr. Der-Shin Ke, Dr. Shwu-Jiuan Liu, Dr. Justin Chen, Dr. Ching-Liang Shen, Dr. Yea-Mei. Leou, Dr. Yin-Han. Kuo, and Dr. Mei-Han Lo for assistance with translation of two instruments into Mandarin Chinese; Dr. S-T. Wang for statistics consulting; Dr. Pamela G. Reed and Dr. Michael L. Hilt for manuscript review.

Abstract

Nursing students worldwide have little interest in caring for a growing elder population. The purpose of this study, based on self-transcendence theory, was to test the effectiveness of a creative-bonding intervention (CBI) to promote self-transcendence and positive attitudes towards elders in Taiwanese nursing students. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare a CBI group (n = 100) with a friendly visit (FV) control group (n = 94). ANCOVA results indicated that after the intervention, the CBI group had significantly more positive attitudes towards elders than the FV group. Nursing school faculty may want to promote art-making activities between students and elders to foster students' interest in elder care. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 32:204–216, 2009

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