Perceptions of bed days for individuals with chronic illness in extended care facilities

Authors

  • Mary T. Fox,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Health, School of Nursing, York University, HNES Building, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3J 1P3
    2. Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • Faculty of Health, School of Nursing, York University, HNES Building, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3J 1P3.
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    • Assistant Professor.

    • Career Scientist.

  • Souraya Sidani,

    1. School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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    • Professor.

    • Canada Research Chair in Design and Evaluation of Health Interventions.

  • Dina Brooks

    1. Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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    • Associate Professor.

    • Canada Research Chair in Rehabilitation for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.


  • The authors would like to thank Amanda Navedita Lachhman for her proofreading assistance, the reviewers for their constructive suggestions, and the study participants for their contribution.

Abstract

We explored perceptions of bed days (defined as staying in bed for 1 or more days per week) in 46 patients receiving extended in-patient services for chronic illness management. Illness onset or exacerbation (35%), limited mobility (22%), and tiredness (15%) were the most prevalent reasons for initiating bed days. Tiredness (44%), limited mobility (26%), pain (24%), bowel treatment (22), and conserving energy for future activities (20%) were the most prevalent current reasons. Most participants (74%) noted having been involved in decisions concerning bed days and preferred to continue bed days. The results suggest patients schedule bed days to manage several health related symptoms. Based on our findings, nurses could help patients to alternate daily upright activity with rest to mitigate the known consequences of bed days. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 32:335–344, 2009

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