Individual and family adaptation in Taiwanese families of individuals with severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI)

Authors

  • Chiu-Yueh Hsiao,

    1. College of Nursing, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
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    • Assistant Professor.

  • Marcia Van Riper

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Nursing/Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carrington Hall, CB #7460, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460
    • School of Nursing/Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carrington Hall, CB #7460, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460.
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    • Associate Professor, Chair of Family Health Division.


  • The first author acknowledges the assistance of Dr. Marcia Van Riper, Dr. Diane Kjervik, Dr. Mark Weaver, Dr. Gary Bowen, and Dr. Yun-Fang Tsai for support and guidance with this research. Thanks are extended to Taiwanese families of individuals with SPMI who participated in this study.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine individual and family adaptation in Taiwanese families of persons with severe and persistent mental illness. Mediating effects of social support and meaning of family caregiving on the relationship between pile-up of demands and family adaptation were also assessed. Data were collected from 84 families using mailed questionnaires and analyzed using principal component analysis and mixed linear modeling. Adaptation was associated with lower pile-up of demands, greater social support, and more positive interpretation of family caregiving. Partially mediating effects of social support and meaning of family caregiving were supported. The results imply a need for developing culturally sensitive interventions to decrease family demands and amplify individual, family, and community strengths and resources. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 32:307–320, 2009

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