Methods to improve reliability of video-recorded behavioral data

Authors

  • Kim Kopenhaver Haidet,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Nursing, 307 Health & Human Development East, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802
    • School of Nursing, 307 Health & Human Development East, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802
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    • Assistant Professor.

  • Judith Tate,

    1. School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
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    • Research Project Manager/Doctoral Candidate.

  • Dana Divirgilio-Thomas,

    1. School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
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    • Research Specialist/Data Manager.

  • Ann Kolanowski,

    1. School of Nursing, 307 Health & Human Development East, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802
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    • Elouise Ross Eberly Professor of Nursing.

  • Mary Beth Happ

    1. School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
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    • Associate Professor.


  • Kim Kopenhaver Haidet was supported by a Johnson & Johnson Health Behaviors and Quality of Life: 2006–2007 grant, Autonomic and Behavioral Stress Responses in Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants. Ann Kolanowski was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research (R01 NR008910), A Prescription For Enhancing Resident Quality of Life. Mary Beth Happ was supported by NINR (K24 NR010244) Symptom Management, Patient-Caregiver Communication, and Outcomes in ICU; NICHD (R01 HD042988) Improving Communication with Non-Speaking ICU Patients.

Abstract

Behavioral observation is a fundamental component of nursing practice and a primary source of clinical research data. The use of video technology in behavioral research offers important advantages to nurse scientists in assessing complex behaviors and relationships between behaviors. The appeal of using this method should be balanced, however, by an informed approach to reliability issues. In this article, we focus on factors that influence reliability, such as the use of sensitizing sessions to minimize participant reactivity and the importance of training protocols for video coders. In addition, we discuss data quality, the selection and use of observational tools, calculating reliability coefficients, and coding considerations for special populations based on our collective experiences across three different populations and settings. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 32: 465–474, 2009

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