Modeling influences on acute care nurses' engagement in tobacco use reduction

Authors

  • Annette S.H. Schultz,

    Corresponding author
    1. Psychosocial Oncology and Cancer Nursing Research Group, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
    • Asper Clinical Research Institute, Room CR 3022, 369 Tache Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R2H 2A6.
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    • Assistant Professor.

  • Shahadut Hossain,

    1. School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
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    • Postdoctoral Research Fellow, British Columbia Cancer Research Centre; Statistical Consultant at NEXUS Research Unit.

  • Joy L. Johnson

    1. School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
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    • Professor.


  • This research was supported by doctoral fellowships to Dr. Schultz from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR), CIHR Transdisciplinary Tobacco Research Training Program, and Heart & Stroke Foundation. Dr. Johnson held an Investigator award from the CIHR.

Abstract

Although nurses are encouraged to address patients' tobacco use, the integration of tobacco reduction into practice has not been consistent. An organizational behavior perspective was used to conceptualize hypothesized relationships among reported influencing factors (individual characteristics, role attitudes, perceived barriers, and workplace climate). Survey data collected at two Western Canadian hospitals (N = 214 nurses; 58% response) were used to test the model. The final model explained nearly 60% of variation in the nurses' tobacco reduction practice. Role attitude, perceived resource availability, co-worker's activities, and ability were the strongest contributors. Nurses' smoking status indirectly influenced practice through shaping role attitudes and perceived ability. Diverse leverage points to enhance nurses' involvement in patients' tobacco use were identified. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 32:621–633, 2009

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