Correlates of physical activity in low income college students

Authors


  • The first author gratefully acknowledges the members of her dissertation committee at NYU, Dr. Danuta Clemmens, and Dr. Wendy C. Budin; and Dr. Sarah Abramowitz at Drew University for their support and guidance.

Abstract

The importance of physical activity as a health promoting behavior has been well documented. We examined the relationship of social support, self-efficacy, and commitment to a plan of physical activity on physical activity behaviors in a sample of low income college students. Those with higher levels of social support, self-efficacy, and commitment to a plan of physical activity reported more physical activity behaviors. Commitment to a plan of physical activity mediated the relationships of social support and physical activity behavior, and of self-efficacy and physical activity behavior. The results support the importance of exploring the psychosocial correlates of physical activity in explaining the decision process that underlies physical activity behavior. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 32:634–646, 2009

Ancillary