Short-term in-home intervention reduces depressive symptoms in Early Head Start Latina mothers of infants and toddlers

Authors

  • Linda S. Beeber,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
    • School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB 7460, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460.
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Frances Hill Fox Term Professor.

  • Diane Holditch-Davis,

    1. School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Marcus Hobbs Professor of Nursing and Associate Dean for Research Affairs.

  • Krista Perreira,

    1. Department of Public Policy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Associate Professor.

  • Todd A. Schwartz,

    1. Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health and School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Research Assistant Professor.

  • Virginia Lewis,

    1. School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Project Manager.

  • Hjordis Blanchard,

    1. School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Data Manager.

  • Regina Canuso,

    1. School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Instructor.

  • Barbara Davis Goldman

    1. Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Scientist and Coordinator of Infant Learning and Assessment.


  • This study was supported by funding from DHHS/Administration for Children and Families/Early Head Start University Partnership grant 90YF0042 (Beeber, PI) and Young Scholars Program of the Foundation for Child Development (Perreira, PI). We are grateful for the help of the participating mothers and their families, our Early Head Start program partners, our research staff, and the intervention nurses—especially Sara L. Emory, RN, MSN, PMHCNS-BC and Carolyn Cooper, PHD, RN. We are indebted to Rachel Chazan Cohen, PhD and the E-PIRC Consortium members (Beeber et al., 2007), Sandy Funk, PhD, and Kathryn E. Barnard, PhD, RN.

Abstract

Depressive symptoms may compromise the ability of low-income Latina mothers with limited English language proficiency to parent their infants or toddlers. Eighty Early Head Start Latina mothers with limited English language proficiency were randomized to an advanced practice nurse-delivered, culturally tailored, in-home psychotherapy intervention, or to usual care. Repeated measures regression analysis showed a significantly greater decrease in depressive symptoms for intervention mothers compared to the usual care group at 22 and 26 weeks (4 weeks post intervention). Intervention mothers' reports of their child's aggression diminished significantly from T1 to T4 compared to usual care mothers (p = .03). Self-efficacy appeared to only partially mediate the intervention effect, and maternal health moderated the intervention impact. Results indicate that the intervention reduced depressive symptoms and, compared to previous studies in this population, retention of mothers in both intervention and control conditions was improved. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 33:60–76, 2010

Ancillary