Predictors of HAV/HBV vaccination completion among methadone maintenance clients

Authors

  • Adeline Nyamathi,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Nursing, University of California-Los Angeles, Room 2-250, Factor Building, Box 951702, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1702
    • School of Nursing, University of California-Los Angeles, Room 2-250, Factor Building, Box 951702, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1702.
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    • Associate Dean for International Research and Scholarly Activities.

  • Karabi Sinha,

    1. School of Nursing, University of California-Los Angeles, Room 2-250, Factor Building, Box 951702, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1702
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    • Statistician.

  • Barbara Greengold,

    1. School of Nursing, University of California-Los Angeles, Room 2-250, Factor Building, Box 951702, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1702
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    • Research Associate.

  • Allan Cohen,

    1. Bay Area Addiction, Research and Treatment, Inc., Los Angeles, CA
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    • Director of Research and Training.

  • Mary Marfisee

    1. David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
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    • Adjunct Associate Professor.


Abstract

This randomized, controlled study (N = 256) was conducted to compare three interventions designed to promote hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination completion among clients undergoing methadone maintenance (MM) treatment. Participants were recruited from five MM treatment sites in Southern California and randomized into three groups: Motivational Interviewing-Single (MI-Single), Motivational Interviewing-Group (MI-Group); and Nurse-Led Hepatitis Health Promotion (HHP). All were offered the three-series HAV/HBV vaccine. A total of 148 participants completed the vaccine. Groups did not differ in rate of vaccination completion (73.6%, HHP group, vs. 65% and 69% for the MI-Single and MI-Group, respectively). The equivalence of findings across groups suggests the value of including nurses with a comprehensive health focus in promoting vaccination completion. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 33:120–132, 2010

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